Tag Archive | business intelligence

My Dog Ate the Requirements, Part 2

DogAteRequirements2

There’s nothing more frustrating than not being able to rely upon a business partner.  There’s lots of business books about information technology that espouses the importance of Business/IT alignment and the importance of establishing business users as IT stakeholders. The whole idea of delivering business value with data and analytics is to provide business users with tools and data that can support business decision making.  It’s incredibly hard to deliver business value when half of the partnership isn’t stepping up to their responsibilities.

There’s never a shortage of rationale as to why requirements haven’t been collected or recorded.  In order for a relationship to be successful, both parties have to participate and cooperate.  Gathering and recording requirements isn’t possible if the technologist doesn’t meet with the users to discuss their needs, pains, and priorities.  Conversely, the requirements process won’t succeed if the users won’t participate. My last blog reviewed the excuses that technologists offered for explaining the lack of documented requirements; this week’s blog focuses on remarks I’ve heard from business stakeholders.

  • “I’m too busy.  I don’t have time to talk to developers”
  • “I meet with IT every month, they should know my requirements”
  • “IT isn’t asking me for requirements, they want me to approve SQL”
  • “We sent an email with a list of questions. What else do they need?”
  • “They have copies of reports we create. That should be enough.”
  • “The IT staff has worked here longer than I have.  There’s nothing I can tell them that they don’t already know”
  • “I’ve discussed my reporting needs in 3 separate meetings; I seem to be educating someone else with each successive discussion”
  • “I seem to answer a lot of questions.  I don’t ever see anyone writing anything down”
  • “I’ll meet with them again when they deliver the requirements I identified in our last discussion.
  • “I’m not going to sign off on the requirements because my business priorities might change – and I’ll need to change the requirements.

Requirements gathering is really a beginning stage for negotiating a contract for the creation and delivery of new software.  The contract is closed (or agreed to) when the business stakeholders agree to (or sign-off on) the requirements document.  While many believe that requirements are an IT-only artifact, they’re really a tool to establish responsibilities of both parties in the relationship.

A requirements document defines the data, functions, and capabilities that the technologist needs to build to deliver business value.  The requirements document also establishes the “product” that will be deployed and used by the business stakeholders to support their business decision making activities. The requirements process holds both parties accountable: technologists to build and business stakeholders to use. When two organizations can’t work together to develop requirements, it’s often a reflection of a bigger problem.

It’s not fair for business stakeholders to expect development teams to build commercial grade software if there’s no participation in the requirements process.  By the same token, it’s not right for technologists to build software without business stakeholder participation. If one stakeholder doesn’t want to participate in the requirements process, they shouldn’t be allowed to offer an opinion about the resulting deliverable.  If multiple stakeholders don’t want to participate in a requirements activity, the development process should be cancelled.  Lack of business stakeholder participation means they have other priorities; the technologists should take a hint and work on their other priorities.

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My Dog Ate the Requirements

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I received a funny email the other day about excuses that school children use to explain why they haven’t done their homework.  The examples were pretty creative:  “my mother took it to be framed”, “I got soap in my eyes and was blinded all night”, and (an oldie and a goody) –“my dog ate my homework”.  It’s a shame that such a creative approach yielded such a high rate of failure. Most of us learn at an early age that you can’t talk your way out of failure; success requires that you do the work.  You’d also think that as people got older and more evolved, they’d realize that there’s very few shortcuts in life.

I’m frequently asked to conduct best practice reviews of business intelligence and data warehouse (BI/DW) projects. These activities usually come about because either users or IT management is concerned with development productivity or delivery quality. The review activity is pretty straight forward; interviews are scheduled and artifacts are analyzed to review the various phases, from requirements through construction to deployment. It’s always interesting to look at how different organizations handle architecture, code design, development, and testing.  One of the keys to conducting a review effort is to focus on the actual results (or artifacts) that are generated during each stage. It’s foolish to discuss someone’s development method or style prior to reviewing the completeness of the artifacts. It’s not necessary to challenge someone approach if their artifacts reflect the details required for the other phases.

And one of the most common problems that I’ve seen with BI/DW development is the lack of documented requirements. Zip – zero –zilch – nothing.  While discussions about requirements gathering, interview styles, and even document details occur occasionally, it’s the lack of any documented requirements that’s the norm.   I can’t imagine how any company allows development to begin without ensuring that requirements are documented and approved by the stakeholders.  Believe it or not, it happens a lot.

So, as a tribute to the creative school children of yesterday and today, I thought I would devote this blog to some of the most creative excuses I’ve heard from development teams to justify their beginning work without having requirements documentation.

  •  “The project’s schedule was published. We have to deliver something with or without requirements”
  • “We use the agile methodology, it’s doesn’t require written requirements”
  • “The users don’t know what they want.”
  • “The users are always too busy to meet with us”
  • “My bonus is based on the number of new reports I create.  We don’t measure our code against requirements”
  • “We know what the users want, we just haven’t written it down”
  • “We’ll document the requirements once our code is complete and testing finished”
  • “We can spend our time writing requirements, or we can spend our time coding”
  • “It’s not our responsibility to document requirements; the users need to handle that”
  • “I’ve been told not to communicate with the business users”

Many of the above items clearly reflect a broken set of management or communication methods. Expecting a development team to adhere to a project schedule when they don’t have requirements is ridiculous.  Forcing a team to commit to deliverables without requirements challenges conventional development methods and financial common sense. It also reflects leadership that focuses on schedules, utilization and not business value.

A development team that is asked to build software without a set of requirements is being set up to fail. I’m always astonished that anyone would think they can argue and justify that the lack of documented requirements is acceptable.  I guess there are still some folks that believe they can talk their way out of failure.

 

 

Role of an Executive Sponsor

It’s fairly common for companies to assign Executive Sponsors to their large projects.  “Large” typically reflects budget size, the inclusion of cross-functional teams, business impact, and complexity.  The Executive Sponsor isn’t the person running and directing the project on a day-to-day basis; they’re providing oversight and direction.  He monitors project progress and ensures that tactics are carried out to support the project’s goals and objectives.  He has the credibility (and authority) to ensure that the appropriate level of attention and resources are available to the project throughout its entire life.

While there’s nearly universal agreement on the importance of an Executive Sponsor, there seems to be limited discussion about the specifics of the role.  Most remarks seem to dwell on the importance on breaking down barriers, dealing with roadblocks, and effectively reacting to project obstacles.  While these details make for good PowerPoint presentations, project success really requires the sponsor to exhibit a combination of skills beyond negotiation and problem resolution to ensure project success.   Here’s my take on some of the key responsibilities of an Executive Sponsor.

Inspire the Stakeholder Audience

Most executives are exceptional managers that understand the importance of dates and budgets and are successful at leading their staff members towards a common goal.  Because project sponsors don’t typically have direct management authority over the project team, the methods for leadership are different.  The sponsor has to communicate, captivate, and engage with the team members throughout all phases of the project.  And it’s important to remember that the stakeholders aren’t just the individual developers, but the users and their management.  In a world where individuals have to juggle multiple priorities and projects, one sure-fire way to maintain enthusiasm (and participation) is to maintain a high-level of sponsor engagement.

Understand the Project’s Benefits

Because of the compartmentalized structure of most organizations, many executives aren’t aware of the details of their peer organizations. Enterprise-level projects enlist an Executive Sponsor to ensure that the project respects (and delivers) benefits to all stakeholders. It’s fairly common that any significantly sized project will undergo scope change (due to budget challenges, business risks, or execution problems).  Any change will likely affect the project’s deliverables as well as the perceived benefits to the different stakeholders. Detailed knowledge of project benefits is crucial to ensure that any change doesn’t adversely affect the benefits required by the stakeholders.

Know the Project’s Details

Most executives focus on the high-level details of their organization’s projects and delegate the specifics to the individual project manager.  When projects cross organizational boundaries, the executive’s tactics have to change because of the organizational breadth of the stakeholder community. Executive level discussions will likely cover a variety of issues (both high-level and detailed).  It’s important for the Executive Sponsor to be able to discuss the brass tacks with other executives; the lack of this knowledge undermines the sponsor’s credibility and project’s ability to succeed.

Hold All Stakeholders Accountable

While most projects begin with everyone aligned towards a common goal and set of tactics, it’s not uncommon for changes to occur. Most problems occur when one or more stakeholders have to adjust their activities because of an external force (new priorities, resource contention, etc.). What’s critical is that all stakeholders participate in resolving the issue; the project team will either succeed together or fail together. The sponsor won’t solve the problem; they will facilitate the process and hold everyone accountable.

Stay Involved, Long Term

The role of the sponsor isn’t limited to supporting the early stages of a project (funding, development, and deployment); it continues throughout the life of the project.  Because most applications have a lifespan of no less than 7 years, business changes will drive new business requirements that will drive new development.  The sponsor’s role doesn’t diminish with time – it typically expands.

The overall responsibility set of an Executive Sponsor will likely vary across projects. The differences in project scope, company culture, business process, and staff resources across individual projects inevitably affect the role of the Executive Sponsor. What’s important is that the Executive Sponsor provides both strategic and tactical support to ensure a project is successful. An Executive Sponsor is more than the project’s spokesperson; they’re the project CEO that has equity in the project’s outcome and a legitimate responsibility for seeing the project through to success.

Photo “American Alligator Crossing the Road at Canaveral National 
Seashore”courtesy of Photomatt28 (Matthew Paulson) via Flickr 
(Creative Commons license).

The Formula for Analytics Success: Data Knowledge


Companies spend a small fortune continually investing and reinvesting in making their business analysts self-sufficient with the latest and greatest analytical tools. Most companies have multiple project teams focused on delivering tools to simplify and improve business decision making. There are likely several standard tools deployed to support the various data analysis functions required across the enterprise: canned/batch reports, desktop ad hoc data analysis, and advanced analytics. There’s never a shortage of new and improved tools that guarantee simplified data exploration, quick response time, and greater data visualization options, Projects inevitably include the creation of dozens of prebuilt screens along with a training workshop to ensure that the users understand all of the new whiz bang features associated with the latest analytic tool incarnation.  Unfortunately, the biggest challenge within any project isn’t getting users to master the various analytical functions; it’s ensuring the users understand the underlying data they’re analyzing.

If you take a look at the most prevalent issue with the adoption of a new business analysis tool is the users’ knowledge of the underlying data.  This issue becomes visible with a number of common problems:  the misuse of report data, the misunderstanding of business terminology, and/or the exaggeration of inaccurate data.  Once the credibility or usability of the data comes under scrutiny, the project typically goes into “red alert” and requires immediate attention. If ignored, the business tool quickly becomes shelfware because no one is willing to take a chance on making business decisions based on risky information.

All too often the focus on end user training is tool training, not data training. What typically happens is that an analyst is introduced to the company’s standard analytics tool through a “drink from a fire hose” training workshop.  All of the examples use generic sales or HR data to illustrate the tool’s strengths in folding, spindling, and manipulating the data.  And this is where the problem begins:  the vendor’s workshop data is perfect.  There’s no missing or inaccurate data and all of the data is clearly labeled and defined; classes run smoothly, but it just isn’t reality  Somehow the person with no hands-on data experience is supposed to figure out how to use their own (imperfect) data. It’s like someone taking their first ski lesson on a cleanly groomed beginner hill and then taking them up to the top of an a black diamond (advanced) run with step hills and moguls.  The person works hard but isn’t equipped to deal with the challenges of the real world.  So, they give up on the tool and tell others that the solution isn’t usable.

All of the advanced tools and manipulation capabilities don’t do any good if the users don’t understand the data. There are lots of approaches to educating users on data.  Some prefer to take a bottom-up approach (reviewing individual table and column names, meanings, and values) while others want to take a top-down approach (reviewing subject area details, the associated reports, and then getting into the data details).  There are certainly benefits of one approach over the other (depending on your audience); however, it’s important not to lose sight of the ultimate goal: giving the users the fundamental data knowledge they need to make decisions.  The fundamentals that most users need to understand their data include a review of

The above details may seem a bit overwhelming if you consider that most companies have mature reporting environments and multi-terabyte data warehouses.  However, we’re not talking about training someone to be an expert on 1000 data attributes contained within your data warehouse; we’re talking about ensuring someone’s ability to use an initial set of reports or a new tool without requiring 1-on-1 training.  It’s important to realize that the folks with the greatest need for support and data knowledge are the newbies, not the experienced folks.

There are lots of options for imparting data knowledge to business users:  a hands-on data workshop, a set of screen videos showing data usage examples, or a simple set of web pages containing definitions, textual descriptions, and screen shots. Don’t get wrapped up in the complexities of creating the perfect solution – keep it simple.  I worked with a client that deployed their information using a set of pages constructed with PowerPoint that folks could reference in a the company’s intranet. If your users have nothing – don’t’ worry about the perfect solution – give them something to start with that’s easy to use.

Remember that the goal is to build users’ data knowledge that is sufficient to get them to adopt and use the company’s analysis tools.  We’re not attempting to convert everyone into data scientists; we just want them to use the tools without requiring 1-on-1 training to explain every report or data element.

Photo courtesy of NASA.  Nasa Ames Research Center engineer H Julian “Harvey” Allen illustrating data knowledge (relating to capsule design for the Mercury program)

Data Governance: Managing Data as an Asset

 

20121029 GoldBullionI always find it interesting when people pile onto the company’s latest and most popular project or initiative. People love to gravitate to whatever is new and sexy within the company, regardless of what they’re working on or their current responsibilities. There never seems to be a shortage of the “bright shiny object” syndrome – you know, organizational ADHD.  This desire to jump on the band wagon often positions individuals with limited experience to own and drive activities they don’t fully understand. The world of data governance is rife with supporters and promoters that are thrilled to be involved, but a bit unprepared to participate and execute.  It’s like loading a gun and pulling the trigger before aiming – you’ll make a lot of noise and likely miss the target.  If only folks spent a bit of time educating others about the meaning and purpose of data governance before they got started.

Let me first offer up some definitions from a few reputable sources…

“Data governance is a set of processes that ensures that important data assets are formally managed throughout the enterprise” (Wikipedia)

“The process by which an organization formalizes the ‘fiduciary duty’ for the management of data assets”  (Forrester Research)

 “…the overall management of the availability, usability, integrity, and security of the data employed in an enterprise” (TechTarget)

For those of you that have experience with data governance, the above definitions are unlikely to be much of a surprise.  For the other 99%, there’s likely to be some head scratching. I actually think most folks that haven’t been indoctrinated to the religion of data have just assumed that data governance is simply a new incarnation of yesterday’s data quality or metadata discussion.  That probably shouldn’t be much of a surprise; the discussion of data inaccuracy and data dictionaries has gotten so much air time over the past 30 years, the typical business user probably feels brainwashed when they hear anything with “data” in the title.  I actually think that Data Governance may win the prize for being among the most misunderstood concepts within Information Technology.

Data governance is a very simple concept.  Data Governance is about establishing the processes for accessing and sharing data and resolving conflict when the processes don’t work.

A Data Governance initiative is really about instilling the concept of managing data as a corporate asset. Companies have standard methods and processes for asset management: your Procurement group has a slew of rules and processes to support the purchasing of office supplies; the HR organization has rules and guidelines for hiring and managing staff; and the finance organization follows “generally accepted accounting principles” to handle managing the company’s fixed and financial assets.  Unfortunately, what we don’t have is a set of generally accepted principles for data. This is what data governance establishes.

The reason that you see the term process in nearly every definition of data governance is that until you establish and standardize data related processes, you’ll never get any of the work done. Getting started with data governance isn’t about establishing a committee – it’s about identifying the goals and identifying the policies and processes that will direct the work activities. You can’t be successful in managing an asset if everyone has their own rules and methods for accessing, manipulating, and using the asset.  This isn’t rocket science – geez – the world of ERP implementations and even business reengineering projects learned this concept more than 10 years ago.

The reason to manage data as a corporate asset is to ensure that business activities that require data are able to use and access data in a simple, uniform, consistent manner.  Unfortunately, in the era of search engines, content indexing, data warehouses, and the Cloud,  finding and acquiring data to support a new business need can be painful, time consuming, and expensive.  Everyone has their own terms, their own private data stash, and their own rules dictating who is and isn’t allowed to access data.  This isn’t corporate asset management– this is corporate asset chaos.  A data governance initiative is one of the best ways to get started in managing data as a corporate asset.

The Time Has Come for Enterprise Search

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Maybe it’s time to challenge the 20 year-old paradigm of making everyone a knowledge worker. For a long time the BI community has assumed that if we give business users the right data and tools, they’ll have the necessary ammunition to do their jobs. But I’m beginning to believe that may no longer be a practical approach. At least not for everyone.

One thing that’s changed in the last dozen-or-so years is that individuals’ job responsibilities have become more complex. The breadth of these responsibilities has grown. I question whether the average business user can really keep track of all the subject area content, all the table definitions, column names, data types, definitions of columns, and locations of all the values across the 6000+ tables in the data mart.

And that’s just the data mart. I’m not even including the applications and systems the average business user interacts with on a daily basis. Not to mention all those presentations, documents, videos, and archived e-mails from customers.

I’m not arguing the value of analytics, nor am I challenging the value of the data warehouse. But is it really practical to expect everyone to generate their own reports? Look at the U.S. tax code. It’s certainly broader than a single CPA can keep track of. Now consider most companies’ Finance departments. There’s more data coming out of Finance than most people can deal with. Otherwise all those specialized applications and dedicated data analysts wouldn’t exist in the first place!

Maybe it’s not about delivering BI tools to every end-user. Maybe it’s about delivering reports in a manner that can be consumed. We’ve gotten so wound-up about detailed data that we haven’t stopped to wonder whether it’s worthwhile to push all that detail to the end-user’s desktop—and then expect him or her to learn all the rules.

One of my brokerage accounts contains 5 different equities. I don’t look at them every day. I don’t look at intra-day price changes. I really don’t need to know. All I really want to know is when I do look at the information, has the stock’s value gone up or down? And how do I get the information? I didn’t build a custom report. I didn’t do drill-down, or drill-across. I went to the web and searched on the stock price.

Maybe instead of buying of a copy of a [name the BI vendor software] tool, we simply build a set of standard reports for key business areas (Sales, Marketing, Finance), and publish them. You can publish these reports to a drive, to a server, to a website, to a portal—it shouldn’t matter. People should find the information with a browser. Reports can be stored and indexed and accessed via an enterprise search engine. Of course, as with everything else, you still need to define terms and metadata so that people understand what they’re reading.

Whenever people talk about enterprise search functionality they’re usually obsessing about unstructured data. But enterprise search can deliver enormous value for structured data. IT departments could be leading the charge if the definition of success weren’t large infrastructure and technology implementation projects and instead data delivery and usage.

The executive doesn’t ask, “What tool did you use to solve this problem?” Instead, she wants to know if the problem has in fact been solved.

The Problem with Total Cost of Ownership

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The issue of Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) seems to come and go every few years. The need for it tends to ebb and flow with corporate budget cycles. TCO is perfectly fine for well-understood commodity functions or defined business processes. If I have to replace a server or a printer, or change a business process, TCO is a perfectly rational metric for comparing different alternatives.

When TCO calculations work, they tend to roll up within a single organization or manager. The hardware, the software, the installation, and the maintenance are under the domain of a single organization that covers the direct cost.

The problem with TCO arises when it’s used as a metric for justifying cross-functional or analytical systems. With these systems, the value isn’t delivering commodity processing but rather supporting decision making. TCO focuses on construction and maintenance costs. But for analytical systems, usage occurs across different organizations and varies with business value and need. TCO can in fact be misapplied.

At a simple level, TCO is often limited to processing hardware, storage, software, and IT resources necessary to configure and manage the platform on an ongoing basis.  But this is usually limited to IT staff focused on system development and maintenance. Unfortunately the most expensive cost—not normally included in TCO calculations—is the business user’s time. While TCO quantifies costs for a data warehouse developer, there is no clear way to calculate costs for the dozens or hundreds of business users who are actually analyzing data and creating reports every day. The reality of analytical systems is that development continues every day on the business side.

Nevertheless it’s common for TCO calculations to be reduced to the cost of processing or storage, rather than reflecting the exponential costs of users circumventing slow-running queries and inaccurate data.  At the end of the day, TCO shouldn’t only be about the cost of hardware and software installation and maintenance. It should be about the cost of continued business usage.

photo by -Luz- via Flickr (Creative Commons license)

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