Tag Archive | best practices

My Dog Ate the Requirements, Part 2

DogAteRequirements2

There’s nothing more frustrating than not being able to rely upon a business partner.  There’s lots of business books about information technology that espouses the importance of Business/IT alignment and the importance of establishing business users as IT stakeholders. The whole idea of delivering business value with data and analytics is to provide business users with tools and data that can support business decision making.  It’s incredibly hard to deliver business value when half of the partnership isn’t stepping up to their responsibilities.

There’s never a shortage of rationale as to why requirements haven’t been collected or recorded.  In order for a relationship to be successful, both parties have to participate and cooperate.  Gathering and recording requirements isn’t possible if the technologist doesn’t meet with the users to discuss their needs, pains, and priorities.  Conversely, the requirements process won’t succeed if the users won’t participate. My last blog reviewed the excuses that technologists offered for explaining the lack of documented requirements; this week’s blog focuses on remarks I’ve heard from business stakeholders.

  • “I’m too busy.  I don’t have time to talk to developers”
  • “I meet with IT every month, they should know my requirements”
  • “IT isn’t asking me for requirements, they want me to approve SQL”
  • “We sent an email with a list of questions. What else do they need?”
  • “They have copies of reports we create. That should be enough.”
  • “The IT staff has worked here longer than I have.  There’s nothing I can tell them that they don’t already know”
  • “I’ve discussed my reporting needs in 3 separate meetings; I seem to be educating someone else with each successive discussion”
  • “I seem to answer a lot of questions.  I don’t ever see anyone writing anything down”
  • “I’ll meet with them again when they deliver the requirements I identified in our last discussion.
  • “I’m not going to sign off on the requirements because my business priorities might change – and I’ll need to change the requirements.

Requirements gathering is really a beginning stage for negotiating a contract for the creation and delivery of new software.  The contract is closed (or agreed to) when the business stakeholders agree to (or sign-off on) the requirements document.  While many believe that requirements are an IT-only artifact, they’re really a tool to establish responsibilities of both parties in the relationship.

A requirements document defines the data, functions, and capabilities that the technologist needs to build to deliver business value.  The requirements document also establishes the “product” that will be deployed and used by the business stakeholders to support their business decision making activities. The requirements process holds both parties accountable: technologists to build and business stakeholders to use. When two organizations can’t work together to develop requirements, it’s often a reflection of a bigger problem.

It’s not fair for business stakeholders to expect development teams to build commercial grade software if there’s no participation in the requirements process.  By the same token, it’s not right for technologists to build software without business stakeholder participation. If one stakeholder doesn’t want to participate in the requirements process, they shouldn’t be allowed to offer an opinion about the resulting deliverable.  If multiple stakeholders don’t want to participate in a requirements activity, the development process should be cancelled.  Lack of business stakeholder participation means they have other priorities; the technologists should take a hint and work on their other priorities.

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My Dog Ate the Requirements

20131016DogAteMyHomework

I received a funny email the other day about excuses that school children use to explain why they haven’t done their homework.  The examples were pretty creative:  “my mother took it to be framed”, “I got soap in my eyes and was blinded all night”, and (an oldie and a goody) –“my dog ate my homework”.  It’s a shame that such a creative approach yielded such a high rate of failure. Most of us learn at an early age that you can’t talk your way out of failure; success requires that you do the work.  You’d also think that as people got older and more evolved, they’d realize that there’s very few shortcuts in life.

I’m frequently asked to conduct best practice reviews of business intelligence and data warehouse (BI/DW) projects. These activities usually come about because either users or IT management is concerned with development productivity or delivery quality. The review activity is pretty straight forward; interviews are scheduled and artifacts are analyzed to review the various phases, from requirements through construction to deployment. It’s always interesting to look at how different organizations handle architecture, code design, development, and testing.  One of the keys to conducting a review effort is to focus on the actual results (or artifacts) that are generated during each stage. It’s foolish to discuss someone’s development method or style prior to reviewing the completeness of the artifacts. It’s not necessary to challenge someone approach if their artifacts reflect the details required for the other phases.

And one of the most common problems that I’ve seen with BI/DW development is the lack of documented requirements. Zip – zero –zilch – nothing.  While discussions about requirements gathering, interview styles, and even document details occur occasionally, it’s the lack of any documented requirements that’s the norm.   I can’t imagine how any company allows development to begin without ensuring that requirements are documented and approved by the stakeholders.  Believe it or not, it happens a lot.

So, as a tribute to the creative school children of yesterday and today, I thought I would devote this blog to some of the most creative excuses I’ve heard from development teams to justify their beginning work without having requirements documentation.

  •  “The project’s schedule was published. We have to deliver something with or without requirements”
  • “We use the agile methodology, it’s doesn’t require written requirements”
  • “The users don’t know what they want.”
  • “The users are always too busy to meet with us”
  • “My bonus is based on the number of new reports I create.  We don’t measure our code against requirements”
  • “We know what the users want, we just haven’t written it down”
  • “We’ll document the requirements once our code is complete and testing finished”
  • “We can spend our time writing requirements, or we can spend our time coding”
  • “It’s not our responsibility to document requirements; the users need to handle that”
  • “I’ve been told not to communicate with the business users”

Many of the above items clearly reflect a broken set of management or communication methods. Expecting a development team to adhere to a project schedule when they don’t have requirements is ridiculous.  Forcing a team to commit to deliverables without requirements challenges conventional development methods and financial common sense. It also reflects leadership that focuses on schedules, utilization and not business value.

A development team that is asked to build software without a set of requirements is being set up to fail. I’m always astonished that anyone would think they can argue and justify that the lack of documented requirements is acceptable.  I guess there are still some folks that believe they can talk their way out of failure.

 

 

Advanced Data Virtualization Capabilities

20130925 AdvancedDV

In one of my previous blogs, I wrote about Data Virtualization technology — one of the more interesting pieces of middleware technology that can simplify data management.   While most of the commercial products in this space share a common set of features and functions, I thought I’d devote this blog to discussing the more advanced features.  There are quite a few competing products; the real challenge in differentiating the products is to understand their more advanced features.

The attraction of data virtualization is that it simplifies data access.  Most IT shops have one of everything – and this includes several different brands of commercial DBMSs, a few open source databases, a slew of BI/reporting tools, and the inevitable list of emerging and specialized tools and technologies (Hadoop, Dremel, Casandra, etc.) Supporting all of the client-to-server-to-repository interfaces (and the associated configurations) is both complex and time consuming.  This is why the advanced capabilities of Data Virtualization have become so valuable to the IT world.

The following details aren’t arranged in any particular order.  I’ve identified the ones that I’ve found to be the most valuable (and interesting).  Let me also acknowledge not every DV product supports all of these features.

Intelligent data caching.  Repository-to-DV Server data movement is the biggest obstacle in query response time.  Most DV products are able to support static caching to reduce repetitive data movement (data is copied and persisted in the DV Server).  Unfortunately, this approach has limited success when there are ad hoc users accessing dozens of sources and thousands of tables.  The more effective solution is for the DV Server to monitor all queries and dynamically cache data based on user access, query load, and table (and data) access frequency.

Query optimization (w/multi-platform execution). While all DV products claim some amount of query optimization, it’s important to know the details. There are lots of tricks and techniques; however, look for optimization that understands source data volumes, data distribution, data movement latency, and is able to process data on any source platform.

Support for multiple client Interfaces.  Since most companies have multiple database products, it can be cumbersome to support and maintain multiple client access configurations.  The DV server can act as a single access point for multiple vendor products (a single ODBC interface can replace drivers for each DBMS brand).  Additionally, most DV Server drivers support multiple different access methods (ODBC, JDBC, XML, and web services).

Attribute level or value specific data security.  This feature supports data security at a much lower granularity than is typically available with most DBMS products.  Data can be protected (or restricted) at individual column values for entire table or selective rows.

Metadata tracking and management.  Since Data Virtualization is a query-centric middleware environment, it only makes sense to position this server to retrieve, reconcile, and store metadata content from multiple, disparate data repositories.

Data lineage. This item works in tandem with the metadata capability and augments the information by retaining the source details for all data that is retrieved.  This not only includes source id information for individual records but also the origin, creation date, and native attribute details.

Query tracking for usage audit. Because the DV Server can act as a centralized access point for user tool access, there are several DV products that support the capture and tracking of all submitted queries.  This can be used to track, measure, and analyze end user (or repository) access.

Workflow linkage and processing.  This is the ability to execute predefined logic against specific data that is retrieved. While this concept is similar to a macro or stored procedure, it’s much more sophisticated.  It could include the ability to direct job control or specialized processing against an answer set prior to delivery (e.g. data hygiene, external access control, stewardship approval, etc.)

Packaged Application Templates.  Most packaged applications (CRM, ERP, etc.) contain thousands of tables and columns that can be very difficult to understand and query.  Several DV vendors have developed templates containing predefined DV server views that access the most commonly queried data elements.

Setup and Configuration Wizards. Configuring a DV server to access the multiple data sources can be a very time consuming exercise; the administrator needs to define and configure every source repository, the underlying tables (or files), along with the individual data fields.  To simplify setup, a configuration wizard reviews the dictionary of an available data source and generates the necessary DV Server configuration details. It further analyzes the table and column names to simplify naming conventions, joins, and data value conversion and standardization details.

Don’t be misled into thinking that Data Virtualization is a highly mature product space where all of the products are nearly identical.  They aren’t.  Most product vendors spend more time discussing their unique features instead of offering metrics about their their core features.  It’s important to remember that every Data Virtualization product requires a server that retrieves and processes data to fulfill query requests. This technology is not a commodity, which means that details like setup/configuration time, query performance, and advanced features can vary dramatically across products.  Benchmark and test drive the technology before buying.

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