Data Strategy Component: Assemble

assemble

This blog is 4th in a series focused on reviewing the individual Components of a Data Strategy.  This edition discusses the component Assemble and the numerous details involved with sourcing, cleansing, standardizing, preparing, integrating, and moving the data to make it ready to use.

The definition of Assemble is:

“Cleansing, standardizing, combining, and moving data residing in multiple locations and producing a unified view”

In the Data Strategy context, Assemble includes all of the activities required to transform data from its host-oriented application context to one that is “ready to use” and understandable by other systems, applications, and users.

Most data used within our companies is generated from the applications that run the company (point-of-sale, inventory management, HR systems, accounting) .  While these applications generate lots of data, their focus is on executing specific business functions; they don’t exist to provide data to other systems.  Consequently, the data that is generated is “raw” in form; the data reflects the specific aspects of the application (or system of origin).  This often means that the data hasn’t been standardized, cleansed, or even checked for accuracy.   Assemble is all of the work necessary to convert data from a “raw” state to one that is ready for business usage.

I’ve identified 5 facets to consider when developing your Data Strategy that are commonly employed to make data “ready to use”.  As a reminder (from the initial Data Strategy Component blog), each facet should be considered individually.  And because your Data Strategy goals will focus on future aspirational goals as well as current needs, you’ll likely want to consider different options for each.  Each facet can target a small organization’s issues or expand to focus on a large company’s diverse needs.

Identification and Matching

Data integration is one of the most prevalent data activities occurring within a company; it’s a basic activity employed by developers and users alike.   In order to integrate data from multiple sources, it’s necessary to determine the identification values (or keys) from each source (e.g. the employee id in an employee list, the part number in a parts list).  The idea of matching is aligning data from different sources with the same identification values.   While numeric values are easy to identify and match (using the “=” operator), character-based values can be more complex (due to spelling irregularities, synonyms, and mistakes). 

Even though it’s highly tactical, Identification and matching is important to consider within a Data Strategy to ensure that data integration is processed consistently. And one of the (main) reasons that data variances continue to exist within companies (despite their investments in platforms, tools, and repositories) is because the need for standardized Identification and Matching has not been addressed.

Survivorship

Survivorship is a pretty basic concept: the selection of the values to retain (or survive) from the different sources that are merged.  Survivorship rules are often unique for each data integration process and typically determined by the developer.  In the context of a data strategy, it’s important to identify the “systems of reference” because the identification of these systems provide clarity to developers and users to understand which data elements to retain when integrating data from multiple systems.

Standardize / Cleanse

The premise of data standardization and cleansing is to identify inaccurate data and correct and reformat the data to match the requirements (or the defined standards) for a specific business element. This is likely the single most beneficial process to improve the business value (and the usability) of data. The most common challenge to data standardization and cleansing is that it can be difficult to define the requirements.  The other challenge is that most users aren’t aware that their company’s data isn’t standardized and cleansed as a matter of practice.   Even though most companies have multiple tools to cleanup addresses, standardize descriptive details, and check the accuracy of values, the use of these tools is not common.

Reference Data  

Wikipedia defines reference data as data that is used to classify or categorize other data.  In the context of a data strategy, reference data is important because it ensures the consistency of data usage and meaning across different systems and business areas.  Successful reference data means that details are consistently identified, represented, and formatted the same way across all aspects of the company (if the color of a widget is “RED”,  then the value is represented as “RED” everywhere – not “R” in product information system, 0xFF0000 in inventory system, and 0xED2939 in product catalog).   A Reference Data initiative is often aligned with a company’s data strategy initiative because of its impact to data sharing and reuse.

Movement Tracking

The idea of movement is to record the different systems that a data element touches as it travels (and is processed) after the data element is created.  Movement tracking (or data lineage) is quite important when the validity and accuracy of a particular data value is questioned.  And in the current era of heightened consumer data privacy and protection, the need for data lineage and tracking of consumer data within a company is becoming a requirement (and it’s the law in California and the European Union).

The dramatic increase in the quantity and diversity of data sources within most companies over the past few years has challenged even the most technology advanced organizations.  It’s not uncommon to find one of the most visible areas of user frustration to be associated with accessing new (or additional) data sources.  Much of this frustration occurs because of the challenge in sourcing, integrating, cleansing, and standardizing new data content to be shared with users.   As is the case with all of the other components, the details are easy to understand, but complex to implement.   A company’s data strategy has to evolve and change when data sharing becomes a production business requirement and users want data that is “ready to use”.

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About Evan Levy

Evan Levy is management consultant and partner at IntegralData. In addition to his day-to-day job responsibilities, Evan speaks, writes, and blogs about the challenges of managing and using data to support business decision making.

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