Data Strategy Component: Store

Store

This blog is 3rd in a series focused on reviewing the individual Components of a Data Strategy.  This edition discusses storage and the details involved with determining the most effective method for persisting data and ensuring that it can be found, accessed, and used.

The definition of Store is:

“Persisting data in a structure and location that supports access and processing across the user audience”

Information storage is one of the most basic responsibilities of an Information Technology organization – and it’s an activity that nearly every company addresses effectively.  On its surface, the idea of storage seems like a pretty simple concept:  setup and install servers with sufficient storage (disk, solid state, optical, etc.) to persist and retain information for a defined period of time.  And while this description is accurate, it’s incomplete.  In the era of exploding data volumes, unstructured content, 3rd party data, and need to share information, the actual media that contains the content is the tip of the iceberg.  The challenges with this Data Strategy Component are addressing all of the associated details involved with ensuring the data is accessible and usable.

In most companies, the options of where data is stored is overwhelming.  The core application systems use special technology to provide fast, highly reliable, and efficiently positioned data. The analytics world has numerous databases and platforms to support the loading and analyzing of a seemingly endless variety of content that spans the entirety of a company’s digital existence. Most team members’ desktops can expand their storage to handle 4 terabytes of data for less than a $100.  And there’s the cloud options that provide a nearly endless set of alternatives for small and large data content and processing needs.  Unfortunately, this high degree of flexibility has introduced a whole slew of challenges when it comes to managing storage:  finding the data, determining if the data has changed, navigating and accessing the details, and knowing the origin (or lineage).

I’ve identified 5 facets to consider when developing your Data Strategy and analyzing data storage and retention. As a reminder (from the initial Data Strategy Component blog), each facet should be considered individually.  And because your Data Strategy goals will focus on future aspirational goals as well as current needs, you’ll likely to want to consider the different options for each.  Each facet can target a small organization’s issues or expand to focus on a large company’s diverse needs.

Stored Content

The most basic facet of storing data is to identify the type of content that will be stored:  raw application data, rationalized business content, or something in between.  It’s fairly common for companies to store the raw data from an application system (frequently in a data lake) as well as the cooked data (in a data warehouse).  The concept of “cooked” data refers to data that’s been standardized, cleaned, and stored in a state that’s “ready-to-use”.   It’s likely that your company also has numerous backup copies of the various images to support the recovery from a catastrophic situation.  The rigor of the content is independent of the platform where the data is stored.

Onboarding Content

There’s a bunch of work involved with acquiring and gathering data to store it and make it “ready-to-use”.  One of the challenges of having a diverse set of data from numerous sources is tracking what you have and knowing where it’s located. Any type of inventory requires that the “stuff” get tracked from the moment of creation.  The idea of Onboarding Content is to centrally manage and track all data that is coming into and distributed within your company (in much the same way that a receiving area works within a warehouse).  The core benefit of establishing Onboarding as a single point of data reception (or gathering) is that it ensures that there’s a single place to record (and track) all acquired data.  The secondary set of benefits are significant: it prevents unnecessary duplicate acquisition, provides a starting point for cataloging, and allows for the checking and acceptance of any purchased content (which is always an issue).

Navigation / Access

All too often, business people know the data want and may even know where the data is located; unfortunately, the problem is that they don’t know how to navigate and access the data where it’s stored (or created).  To be fair, most operational application systems were never designed for data sharing; they were configured to process data and support a specific set of business functions.  Consequently, accessing the data requires a significant level of system knowledge to navigate the associated repository to retrieve the data.   In developing a Data Strategy, it’s important to identify the skills, tools, and knowledge required for a user to access the data they require.  Will you require someone to have application interface and programming skills?  SQL skills and relational database knowledge?  Or, spreadsheet skills to access a flat file, or some other variation?

Change Control

Change control is a very simple concept: plan and schedule maintenance activities, identify outages, and communicate those details to everyone.  This is something that most technologists understand. In fact, most Information Technology organizations do a great job of production change control for their application environments.  Unfortunately, few if any organizations have implemented data change control.  The concept for data is just as simple:  plan and schedule maintenance activities, identify outages (data corruption, load problems, etc.), and communicate those details to everyone.  If you’re going to focus any energy on a data strategy, data change control should be considered in the top 5 items to be included as a goal and objective.

Platform Access

As I’ve already mentioned, most companies have lots of different options for housing data.  Unfortunately, the criteria for determining the actual resting place for data often comes down to convenience and availability. While many companies have architecture standards and recommendations for where applications and data are positioned, all too often the selection is based on either programmer convenience or resource availability.  The point of this area isn’t to argue what the selection criteria are, but to identify them based on core strategic (and business operation) priorities.

In your Data Strategy effort, you may find the need to include other facets in your analysis.  Some of the additional details that I’ve used in the past include metadata, security, retention, lineage, and archive access.  While simple in concept, this particular component continues to evolve and expand as the need for data access and sharing grows within the business world.

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About Evan Levy

Evan Levy is management consultant and partner at IntegralData. In addition to his day-to-day job responsibilities, Evan speaks, writes, and blogs about the challenges of managing and using data to support business decision making.

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