Hadoop Replacing Data Warehouse Processing

20131126HadoopReplacingDW-SnakeOilSalesMan

I was recently asked about my opinion for the potential of Hadoop replacing a company’s data warehouse (DW).  While there’s lots to be excited about when it comes to Hadoop, I’m not currently in the camp of folks that believe it’s practical to use Hadoop to replace a company’s DW.  Most corporate DW systems are based on commercial relational database products and can store and manage multiple terabytes of data and support hundreds (if not thousands) of concurrent users.  It’s fairly common for these systems to handle complex, mixed workloads –queries processing billions of rows across numerous tables along with simple primary key retrieval requests all while continually loading data.  The challenge today is that Hadoop simply isn’t ready for this level of complexity.

All that being said,  I do believe there’s a huge opportunity to use Hadoop to replace a significant amount of processing that is currently being handled by most DWs.  Oh, and data warehouse user won’t be affected at all.

Let’s review a few fundamental details about the DW. There’s two basic data processing activities that occur on a DW: query processing and transformation processing. Query processing is servicing the SQL that’s submitted from all of the tools and applications on the users’ desktops, tablets, and phones.  Transformation processing is the workload involved with converting data from their source application formats to the format required by the data warehouse. While the most visible activity to business users is query processing, it is typically the smaller of the two.  Extracting and transforming the dozens (or hundreds) of source data files for the DW is a huge processing activity.  In fact, most DWs are not sized for query processing; they are sized for the daily transformation processing effort.

It’s important to realize that one of the most critical service level agreements (SLAs) of a DW is data delivery.  Business users want their data first thing each morning.  That means the DW has to be sized to deliver data reliably each and every business morning.  Since most platforms are anticipated to have a 3+ year life expectancy, IT has to size the DW system based on the worst case data volume scenario for that entire period (end of quarter, end of year, holidays, etc.) This means the DW is sized to address a maximum load that may only occur a few times during that entire period.

This is where the opportunity for Hadoop seems pretty obvious. Hadoop is a parallel, scalable framework that handles distributed batch processing and large data volumes. It’s really a set of tools and technologies for developers, not end users.  This is probably why so many ETL (extract, transformation, and load) product vendors have ported their products to execute within a Hadoop environment.  It only makes sense to migrate processing from a specialized platform to commodity hardware. Why bog down and over invest in your DW platform if you can handle the heavy lifting of transformation processing on a less expensive platform?

Introducing a new system to your DW environment will inevitably create new work for your DW architects and developers. However, the benefits are likely to be significant.  While some might view such an endeavor as a creative way to justify purchasing new hardware and installing Hadoop, the real reason is to extend the life of the data warehouse (and save your company a bunch of money by deferring a DW upgrade)

Advertisements

Tags: , , , ,

About Evan Levy

Evan Levy is Vice President of Business Consulting at SAS. In addition to his day-to-day job responsibilities, Evan speaks, writes, and blogs about the challenges of managing and using data to support business decision making.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: