My Dog Ate the Requirements

20131016DogAteMyHomework

I received a funny email the other day about excuses that school children use to explain why they haven’t done their homework.  The examples were pretty creative:  “my mother took it to be framed”, “I got soap in my eyes and was blinded all night”, and (an oldie and a goody) –“my dog ate my homework”.  It’s a shame that such a creative approach yielded such a high rate of failure. Most of us learn at an early age that you can’t talk your way out of failure; success requires that you do the work.  You’d also think that as people got older and more evolved, they’d realize that there’s very few shortcuts in life.

I’m frequently asked to conduct best practice reviews of business intelligence and data warehouse (BI/DW) projects. These activities usually come about because either users or IT management is concerned with development productivity or delivery quality. The review activity is pretty straight forward; interviews are scheduled and artifacts are analyzed to review the various phases, from requirements through construction to deployment. It’s always interesting to look at how different organizations handle architecture, code design, development, and testing.  One of the keys to conducting a review effort is to focus on the actual results (or artifacts) that are generated during each stage. It’s foolish to discuss someone’s development method or style prior to reviewing the completeness of the artifacts. It’s not necessary to challenge someone approach if their artifacts reflect the details required for the other phases.

And one of the most common problems that I’ve seen with BI/DW development is the lack of documented requirements. Zip – zero –zilch – nothing.  While discussions about requirements gathering, interview styles, and even document details occur occasionally, it’s the lack of any documented requirements that’s the norm.   I can’t imagine how any company allows development to begin without ensuring that requirements are documented and approved by the stakeholders.  Believe it or not, it happens a lot.

So, as a tribute to the creative school children of yesterday and today, I thought I would devote this blog to some of the most creative excuses I’ve heard from development teams to justify their beginning work without having requirements documentation.

  •  “The project’s schedule was published. We have to deliver something with or without requirements”
  • “We use the agile methodology, it’s doesn’t require written requirements”
  • “The users don’t know what they want.”
  • “The users are always too busy to meet with us”
  • “My bonus is based on the number of new reports I create.  We don’t measure our code against requirements”
  • “We know what the users want, we just haven’t written it down”
  • “We’ll document the requirements once our code is complete and testing finished”
  • “We can spend our time writing requirements, or we can spend our time coding”
  • “It’s not our responsibility to document requirements; the users need to handle that”
  • “I’ve been told not to communicate with the business users”

Many of the above items clearly reflect a broken set of management or communication methods. Expecting a development team to adhere to a project schedule when they don’t have requirements is ridiculous.  Forcing a team to commit to deliverables without requirements challenges conventional development methods and financial common sense. It also reflects leadership that focuses on schedules, utilization and not business value.

A development team that is asked to build software without a set of requirements is being set up to fail. I’m always astonished that anyone would think they can argue and justify that the lack of documented requirements is acceptable.  I guess there are still some folks that believe they can talk their way out of failure.

 

 

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About Evan Levy

Evan Levy is Vice President of Business Consulting at SAS. In addition to his day-to-day job responsibilities, Evan speaks, writes, and blogs about the challenges of managing and using data to support business decision making.

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